Posts Tagged ‘dessert’

I Got Stuffed at Betty’s Pie Whole

Betty's Pie WholeIt’s a restaurant…get yer mind outta the gutter, sheesh!

Betty’s Pie Whole is an adorable little restaurant and bakery on the corner of Encinitas Blvd and Quail Gardens Road (Encinitas, CA – that’s in San Diego). It’s in the Sunshine Gardens lot.

I’ve been here twice, both times after visiting the Botanic Gardens with J and her friends / my friends (i.e. play date or playgroup).

Betty's Pie Whole - Get Along Lil' Kielbasy Pie

Get Along Lil’ Kielbasy Individual size pie

The first time I ate here I ordered the individual size Chicken Pot Pie. This time I ordered the individual Get Along Lil’ Kielbasy Pie. Oh my, is this good! The crust has savory herbs (sage and I don’t know what else) and inside is poultry kielbasa, red potatoes, mushrooms, spinach and béchamel. I like to pretend it’s good for me since I’m eating my spinach…just ignore the cream sauce and flakey butter pastry that envelopes the ingredients like a cozy edible blanket.

Betty's Pie Whole - Mississippi MudJ gets an individual Mississippi Mud Pie for lunch. Yes, I let my daughter eat pie for lunch. Don’t judge. It doesn’t happen everyday. This is the description of the pie, according to Betty’s web site: Chocolate shortbread shell is filled with Belgian chocolate pudding,  house-made marshmallow, brownie chunks, butterscotch swirls, and finished with two kinds of chocolate drizzle! 

Now I’ve tasted this little bit of chocolately heaven and it is delish! My odd ball child won’t eat the hand made marshmallows, she prefers Jet Puffed. Kids!

There is a nice room to enjoy your meal and also an outdoor space where you can let your rug rats run free while you lick every last crumb out of the bottom of the pie tin (oops, I didn’t mean to say that outloud). The decor is saloon / western style with a little bit of humor — a toilet with a jade plant sits outside of the restrooms.

Betty's Pie Whole - Uncooked Individual Pies

They put a cute little “c” on the Chicken Pot Pie!

Here’s another GREAT thing about Betty’s Pie Whole, you can take a pre-made, uncooked pie and bake it at home (individual and full sizes)! Since Curt’s favorite food is chicken pot pie, I decided to be a nice wifey and bring one home. I also bought another Kielbasy. If you’re going to eat the pies that night, just refrigerate them. But if you want to serve in a day or two, they recommend freezing. You can cook straight from the freezer but it will add quite a bit of cooking time. Ask for printed cooking directions when you buy your pie.

After tasting the Chicken Pot Pie and the Kielbasy side by side at home, I will say that I prefer the chicken. BUT, don’t get me wrong, the Kielbasy is great. I would (and will) order it again. And the chicken.

For more information, visit Betty’s web site or stop by 155 Quail Garden Dr. Encinitas, CA 92024

Sugar Cookies with Royal Icing & Spider Cookie Details

Once you’ve made your sugar cookies, it’s time to decorate! As I mentioned in my sugar cookie recipe post, you can make the cookies ahead of time and store them in an air-tight container for a week or so or freeze them. I’ve also frozen the dough and thawed overnight in the refrigerator.

If you’re not familiar with royal icing, it’s pretty neat! It dries hard so you can stack decorated cookies or package individually and not worry about the decoration getting smooshed. In terms of flavor, of course, a butter-based frosting would be tastier, but then I don’t think it would be considered icing…that’s why it’s called frosting. Anyway, I think the cookie and icing together tastes pretty good. Alone, the flavor of the icing just tastes like sugar.

Halloween_Spider_Cookie_2013

Last year, Bridget from Bake at 350 said my spider cookie was “adorable”. SQUEEE!!!!!

I learned everything I ever wanted to know about royal icing from Bake at 350. Bridget’s tutorial is here. I love her cookie designs and last year I even sent her a picture of the spider cookies I made (inspired by her design). She wrote me back and said my cookies were adorable. I’m officially **star struck**. :D

The recipe for royal icing is pretty simple. Again, I use organic ingredients whenever possible so in this case the powdered sugar and corn syrup that I use are organic. I won’t go into the instructions for making the icing because Bridget does such a great job. Here’s her royal icing tutorial link again.

The icing also freezes well, so if you have leftovers, don’t pitch it. It keeps for a couple months and is great to have on hand when your preschooler demands “fancy cookies.”

Halloween Spider Cookies 2014This year’s spider cookies were decorated in two evenings. The first night I covered each cookie with white royal icing and then orange flat dots. I let them dry overnight.

The second night is when I added the web and spider. I used a number 2 round tip on a tube of store-bought black icing for the web and legs. Yes, I could make my own black icing but it takes a disgusting amount of food coloring and in this case ignorance is bliss. I don’t want to think about what goes into making it black so I just unscrew the cap and I’m none the wiser.

While a number 1 round tip would make a more delicate web, I must admit that my hand cramps up way too much when using this tip. I made spider man cookies earlier this year with the small tip and thank god I only made a dozen or so. My hand felt like it had been squashed under a steam roller when I was done decorating.

To make the spider’s body I use a number 6 round tip and squeeze a blob of icing onto the cookie. Dip your finger in water (it should be damp, not drippy) and gently pat the black blob until it looks like a circle. You can do the same with the spider’s legs if the end of the icing pokes up.

Finally, I take two white sprinkles and with (clean) tweezers, I carefully place them into the spider’s body. Creepy and cute at the same time!










DIY Sugar Cookies – Better Than Store-Bought!

Cookie_CollageI’ve been making sugar cookies for a few years now, but only for special occasions. This means I don’t make them all the time and I get a little rusty, but it’s kind of like riding a bike…once you do it you don’t forget how…or at least you remember most of what needs to be done.

I don’t take credit for any of my designs. I’m good at copying so when the need for fancy cookies arises, I search the internet for inspiration and then I copy as best I can. This means that you, yes – YOU – can make these cookies too! I’m a self-taught baker and cook so I really believe anyone can do this with a little practice and determination.

First off, the sugar cookie recipe. This is the only recipe I use, and I swear by it (and so does everyone that eats my cookies)! It’s from Sweetapolita and includes instructions for making cookie pops. I started out by making pops, but then got lazy and realized people were as equally impressed by a decorated cookie as there were by a decorated cookie on a stick. Click here for the original recipe or keep scrolling to see my version at the bottom of this page. It includes my shortcuts and changes as well as some other tips. Most importantly, I cut the recipe in half because my stand mixer almost jumped off my counter the first time I made the recipe. The dough climbed up my mixer attachment and it was a mess!

The recipe and tips for decorating with royal icing are in my next post.

I don’t deviate from the ingredients in the recipe! And, I always freeze for 10 minutes before baking. If you don’t, well…ever see this picture on the interwebz? That really will be your cookies if you don’t freeze your cut dough shapes before baking!

Sugar Cookie Fail

The other change that I make is rolling the dough to 5/8″ thick instead of 1/4″. You will need (clean) dowels for this. I love the taste of the cookie and I guess I like a slightly larger cookie to icing ratio. Of course, by rolling thicker cookies you won’t yield quite as many per batch as Sweetapolita does. The other thing I do is use a postal scale to precisely measure the weights (in grams) of all of my ingredients. This seems pretty anal, but perfection does require a little extra effort. ;) If you don’t have a postal scale (really, who does?) then a reliable kitchen scale will work. You can get one here.

If you get hooked into cookie making, I suggest buying a bunch of cookie cutters. You will invariably need to buy more, but something like Wilton’s 101-Piece Cookie Cutter Set will get you off to a great start.

As I say with all of my recipes, I prefer to use organic ingredients whenever possible. Of course, substitute for conventional ingredients so you can get your daily dose of GMOs (wink wink).

Sugar Cookies - Better Than Store-Bought!
 
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: snack, dessert
Cuisine: American
Serves: 18 - 20 cookies
Ingredients
  • 3 cups (375 g) all-purpose organic flour, sifted
  • ½ teaspoon (4 g) salt
  • 1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted organic butter, softened at room temperature
  • 1 cup (200 g) organic sugar
  • 1 large organic egg, cold
  • 1½ teaspoons pure vanilla extract - organic
  • ⅛ teaspoon pure lemon extract - organic
Directions
  1. In large bowl, sift together flour and salt. Set aside.
  2. In an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream butter and sugar until fluffy and pale, about 5 minutes. Beat in egg.
  3. Add vanilla and lemon extract and mix until incorporated.
  4. Add flour mixture and mix on low speed until thoroughly combined. *Do not overmix! Once the dough comes away from the side of the bowl, turn off the mixer.
  5. Remove ½ of dough from bowl, make a ball, and place on a large piece of plastic wrap on counter. Make a disc about 2" thick and cover with the plastic wrap. Repeat with 2nd half of dough. Chill both discs of dough for about 45 minutes in the refrigerator.
  6. Remove discs and let sit on the counter for 10 minutes. This softens the dough enough to make it easy to roll, but still keeping it cold. If you are super strong (not me), go ahead and roll it right out of the refrigerator. I cannot seem to do this successfully!
  7. Place disc on top of a large piece of parchment paper. I put the parchment on a large cutting board on top of our kitchen table. We have tall counters and I get better rolling leverage when placed on the table which is shorter than our counters. Place two ⅝" wooden dowels on either side of your dough, then another sheet of parchment paper.
  8. Roll dough so it's even with the dowels. You should not see any speed bumps in the dough. If you do, keep rolling until it's entirely smooth and an even thickness.
  9. Cut your shapes and place on a parchment lined cookie sheet that will fit in your freezer. Re-roll excess dough. Waste not want not! Place the cut shapes in the freezer for 10 minutes.
  10. Preheat your oven to 350° F. I find that by the time my oven is hot, my cookies are semi-frozen.
  11. Remove cookies from freezer and place on another parchment (or silpat) lined cookie sheet. Place cookies at least 1" (one inch) away from each other and away from the edge of the cookie sheet.
  12. Bake 14 - 16 minutes, or until edges are golden brown. Sometimes the edges of my cookies do not brown, but the bottoms do. It may take a little trial and error to find the right baking time.
  13. Cool sheets on wire racks for 10 minutes, then gently remove cookies and place on wire racks to finish cooling.
  14. Cookies can be made ahead of time (without decorating) as long as they are stored at room temperature in an airtight container. They will last 2 weeks. You can also freeze them.

 

Looking for the royal icing recipe? Click the link.

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